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 Post subject: Really lacking on understanding of the opening?
Post #1 Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 8:49 pm 
Beginner
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What books do you recommend to improve my ability to comprehend the opening. These are the books I have on the subject:

Dictionary of Basic Joseki
Opening theory
38 Basic Joseki

I have no books on fuseki. Some books that go lightly over a couple of these will be helpful. I don't need anything too
complicated at the moment, I really just need something so I can understand why to play certain fuseki and what certain
fuseki accomplish.

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Post #2 Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 10:31 pm 
Judan
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Hi UnitedGo,

Robert has already provided some answers in another thread.
I second that a key part is your tactical fundamentals.

For example, in your June 07 game, for :b21: :
no reason not to first atari at D13.
( The follow-up move :b23: is another question all together. )

Subsequently, see your own post 9.
Basics like these are crucial.

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Post #3 Posted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 11:32 pm 
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EdLee wrote:
Hi UnitedGo,

Robert has already provided some answers in another thread.
I second that a key part is your tactical fundamentals.

For example, in your June 07 game, for :b21: :
no reason not to first atari at D13.
( The follow-up move :b23: is another question all together. )

Subsequently, see your own post 9.
Basics like these are crucial.

Thanks. Will take into mind.

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 Post subject: Re: Really lacking on understanding of the opening?
Post #4 Posted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 12:03 am 
Judan

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UnitedGo wrote:
What books do you recommend to improve my ability to comprehend the opening. These are the books I have on the subject:

Dictionary of Basic Joseki
Opening theory
38 Basic Joseki

I have no books on fuseki.


Actually, you do. Opening theory is about fuseki. :)

Quote:
Some books that go lightly over a couple of these will be helpful. I don't need anything too complicated at the moment,


Indeed. In fact, anything at all complicated is very likely to be rewritten in the next few years, thanks to AlphaGo and, I expect, other strong programs to come. The effect on opening theory is likely to be at least as transformative as that of the New Fuseki of the early 20th century.

Quote:
I really just need something so I can understand why to play certain fuseki and what certain fuseki accomplish.


Skip that. There is a good chance that you would have to unlearn anything so specific in the next few years.

The main advantage AlphaGo has over modern pros is superior strategy. When it believes that it has the advantage, it tends to play solidly, even taking local losses to do so. But, as we see when it plays itself, and does not seem to have an early advantage, it plays lightly, often sacrificing stones almost casually. OC, simply imitating its moves could be disastrous, but that does not mean that you should not strive to play lightly, and not try to hold on to either stones or territory for dear life. With that in mind, I think that Takemiya's advice is good: Play where you want to play. :D

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 Post subject: Re: Really lacking on understanding of the opening?
Post #5 Posted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:40 am 
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It totally agree with Edlee before to be single digit kyu, the best way to improve fuseki is to avoid local mistakes,especially useless moves.
Before that, the sente has not enough values to really understand the fuseki.

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 Post subject: Re: Really lacking on understanding of the opening?
Post #6 Posted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:29 pm 
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Thanks for all the advice.

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 Post subject: Re: Really lacking on understanding of the opening?
Post #7 Posted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:30 pm 
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Post #8 Posted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 4:45 pm 
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UnitedGo wrote:
What books do you recommend to improve my ability to comprehend the opening. These are the books I have on the subject:

Dictionary of Basic Joseki
Opening theory
38 Basic Joseki

I have no books on fuseki. Some books that go lightly over a couple of these will be helpful. I don't need anything too
complicated at the moment, I really just need something so I can understand why to play certain fuseki and what certain
fuseki accomplish.
Joseki are prescribed local lines of play and, at least for corner plays in the opening, these change from year to year. I would memorize them just to learn something from the lines of play and learn how to improve my position in the opening so that I'm OK when heading into the middle game. A corner joseki is really just a big cross-cut fight and for both sides there are 3 rules to follow in them.

1. Can you capture one of the cutting enemy stones? If so, do it. Otherwise, on to the next question.
2. Can you save both of your stone groups under attack? If so, do it. Otherwise, on to the following.
3. Save the more important group and give up the less important one.

Of course it will take some practice applying these 3 guidelines before you become proficient at playing out joseki-like sequences. Also, to read out joseki sequences one needs a good command of life & death and tesuji first.

Fuseki are just like joseki, but they cover then entire board for the first several moves. There are fuseki for 4-4 point, such as sanrensei, tasukiboshi (diagonal fuseki) as seen in the games of Huang Longshi and other old Chinese masters, and nirensei, as well fuseki for 3-4 point, such as the Shusaku. Modern fuseki, such as the Kobayashi and Chinese, combine 3-4 and 4-4 point plays.

A stone situated on the 4-4 point is balanced in both directions, but is on the 4th line and so best used to create outward (toward the center) influence. A stone on 3-4 or 4-3 is better positioned to protect the corner, but in one direction it emphasizes influence and in the other emphasizes territorial gain. A 3-3 stone occupies the corner in one move, but is liable to be shut in when an enemy stone is on the 4-4 point. A 5-3 or 5-4 stone is for developing the side and offers little coverage for the corner. To protect the corner, another move, on 3-4 point, is necessary. After enclosures or 4-4 plays are made, a point on the side should be claimed or an approach play to the corner made. An opening play on 5-5 is definitely center-oriented and is for the player looking to trade the solidity of a corner enclosure for the flexibility of play in the center.

Where to play in the opening? Usually, one plays in the corner area, then takes a point on the side to increase the potential for territorial gain or outward influence later on. Whether to play solidly and make corner enclosure or just take a point on the side depends on what kind of fuseki has been played. In any fuseki where there is no moyo potential, playing solid and making a corner enclosure first is better. Otherwise, if you have a parallel fuseki, there is the potential for moyo formation, so either you make a moyo yourself or prevent your opponent from forming one himself. Two ways are to take a point on the side, such as 10-3 or 10-4, after playing on 4-4, and to take a side point on the 3rd line, such as 3-10 or 8-3, after enclosing the corner with plays on 3-4 and 5-3.

To begin getting a grasp of how opening plays work (and for something that certainly beats whatever I have offered here so far), I recommend replaying game records, in each one for at least the first 100 moves and all the way to the final play if you want to see just why the opening is considered the most important stage in a game of Go. The games of Gu Li or Lee Chang-ho, for example, have good examples of opening play. If you have the time to replay using board & stones but not enough money to purchase a game collection, yet have access to a printer, you can go to the below link and download printable PDF files of game collections.

viewtopic.php?f=17&t=10643

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