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 Post subject: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #1 Posted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 11:48 am 
Gosei

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Kiseido has just issued a translation by John Power of Shibano Toramaru's book Fuseki Kakumei (Fuseki Revolution). The book discusses why Chinese fuseki and Sanrensei are not so popular now, how AI play has changed attitudes toward conventional wisdom andevaluations, and new AI generated joseki.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #2 Posted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 12:34 pm 
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gowan wrote:
Kiseido has just issued a translation by John Power of Shibano Toramaru's book Fuseki Kakumei (Fuseki Revolution). The book discusses why Chinese fuseki and Sanrensei are not so popular now, how AI play has changed attitudes toward conventional wisdom andevaluations, and new AI generated joseki.
Did you get it? What do you think?
There was some more discussion on it here: https://lifein19x19.com/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=18349

I ended up getting the book in Japanese a few months ago before the English version was announced. I've only gone though a few of the fusekis, mostly the first section. Translating is an effort so I just read the parts I was interested in. I thought about just buying it again in English but I have other books to read too.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #3 Posted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 2:03 pm 
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It is a useful book, readable for players at kyu level through dan levels. I couldn't say whether it is out of date already since I myself am out of date LOL (or is that expression itself out of date). I came up as a go player in the 1970's, thoroughly imbued with the Japanese approach. In fact I still like that way of playing go and I think it offers valuable insights even now that people are disparaging Japanese go. Also I side with John Fairbairn concerning time limits. I believe we need to understand what we are doing. It is no good for humans to imitate machines; just as the development of "deep learning" techniques found a way to play that suits the machine, humans should find a human way to play. I liked hearing Michael Redmond reject an AI move because he just didn't like it, and Shibano also says that he dislikes some of the AI moves. There have been "revolutions" before. I recall how different the playing of Chinese and Korean players seemed when we began to be aware of Chinese go via the visits of Chinese players to Japan and the China-Japan Supergo matches occurred, and Go World covered games of the top Korean players. Well, I got off the topic of Shibano's book, but what I find the most interesting thing about it is that Shibano explains why many of the strange-looking AI moves work.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #4 Posted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 4:51 pm 
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gowan wrote:
... Well, I got off the topic of Shibano's book, but what I find the most interesting thing about it is that Shibano explains why many of the strange-looking AI moves work.


I think AI will not have really arrived until they have cracked the real AI challenge: AIs should be able to provide human comments on their own games, explaining to us humans why they work.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #5 Posted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 6:21 pm 
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gowan wrote:
It is no good for humans to imitate machines; just as the development of "deep learning" techniques found a way to play that suits the machine, humans should find a human way to play. I liked hearing Michael Redmond reject an AI move because he just didn't like it, and Shibano also says that he dislikes some of the AI moves.
I agree to an extent. But I also think that it depends on how close to the AI's skill a player is, or how much stronger a player is compared to the opponent. Top pros can copy AIs because they can back it up. But for me, I'm not going to be able to successfully invade a moyo like an AI, find tesujis like an AI, and I can't be convinced that setting up an elaborate ko is a better move. So I find little point in copying AI beyond what a pro can explain to me. I like Shibano's explanations before they are short. I just did a quick check and many of the variation are only a few moves, with some being around 10 and hardly any approaching 20.
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hzamir wrote:
I think AI will not have really arrived until they have cracked the real AI challenge: AIs should be able to provide human comments on their own games, explaining to us humans why they work.
I believe even before Alpha Go I was working on a technique to explain gradient boosting tree machine learning(not than neural networks). A quick search shows that Google has been working on this issue: https://cloud.google.com/explainable-ai. I don't know who would sponsor the effort though.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #6 Posted: Wed Oct 27, 2021 4:23 am 
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I read quite a bit of the original Shibano. I had to because I was writing The First Teenage Meijin.

It appealed to me because he had next to no recourse to numbers or win rates. Indeed, it wasn't even clear that he was using AI at all. He said his main approach to the topic was to look at internet games by other pros and see what they were doing differently from normal pro play, on the assumption that they had been copying AI.

This means he has been looking at the topic in away quite different from most people. At least, as far as I can judge, almost all amateurs but also many pros have been taking the approach of monkey see, monkey do. Shibano's approach has been see monkey do, what human think of it?

That's so refreshing. But it's no guarantee that he came up with useful answers. In one sense he did. He won the Meijin. But how much of that was because of psychological effects? How much was random chance?

I personally didn't find much of what he said about AI moves themselves at all useful. The greatest value for me was in what he said about traditional moves seen through the prism of AI moves. Since, as other people have remarked above, we humans still need a rationale we can handle in a practical way to play go, any insights on traditional go which is likewise based on that perspective are likely to help.

In short, just as Shibano let other pros do the donkey work, we amateurs should also let others do the monkey work.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #7 Posted: Wed Oct 27, 2021 5:30 am 
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Where is it possible to buy it in Europe ?

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #8 Posted: Wed Oct 27, 2021 6:52 am 
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hzamir wrote:
gowan wrote:
... Well, I got off the topic of Shibano's book, but what I find the most interesting thing about it is that Shibano explains why many of the strange-looking AI moves work.


I think AI will not have really arrived until they have cracked the real AI challenge: AIs should be able to provide human comments on their own games, explaining to us humans why they work.


It's a side note of course but I disagree. Intelligence can show through articulation but it is not restricted by it. Human experts who are inept at explaining why they know what they know, do exist, in spite of the Feynman principle. Ramanujan is a good example. He "saw" properties of numbers without being able to explain to a(nother) human how he was able to do that. It's very similar to AI Go bots showing us sequences without an explanation. In Ramanujan's case, we had good reason to doubt our own intelligence, not his. In AI's case, why should we do otherwise? We already call it artificial to distinguish the nature of the intelligence.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #9 Posted: Wed Oct 27, 2021 8:17 am 
Gosei

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When I wrote "imitate" above I meant that the human player makes an AI move only for the reason that an AI made that move in some position. In the past players were chastised for following "joseki" moves without understanding the meaning.

As for Ramanujan's mathematics, he was fortunate that Hardy was willing to spend time and hard work to validate many of Ramanujan's formulas. Ramanujan had been dismissed by other professional mathematicians and I think he might never have been recognized had Hardy not seen Ramanujan's merit. The success of AI players demonstrates the validity of the way AI's play. I wonder whether there could be a method of play that is superior to the current AI method. For example if quantum computers ever develop to a high level of practical function, maybe current AI-style go might be superseded.

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 Post subject: Re: English translation of Shibano's Fuseki Revolution
Post #10 Posted: Wed Oct 27, 2021 10:06 am 
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lichigo wrote:
Where is it possible to buy it in Europe ?


My attempt to buy directly from Bozulich has failed this time because I got no clear confirmation that it would be ok.

I looked at Schaak en Gowinkel het Paard but their postage to Germany is too high for a single book.

I asked Hebsacker Verlag (in Germany) and they expect it in November. However, unless you live in Germany, their international postage is also too high, I think.

I have not noticed other European retailers listing that book (yet). It has not been at Amazon.DE or .UK.

So unless you live in the Netherlands or Germany, asking Bozulich directly might still be worth trying because airmail postage from Asia is surprisingly low.

As long as USPS is having trouble with Corona, ordering from Kiseido.USA is not really an option for Europeans.

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