It is currently Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:40 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 34 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
Offline
 Post subject:
Post #21 Posted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:35 am 
Honinbo
User avatar

Posts: 8665
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Liked others: 323
Was liked: 2007
GD Posts: 312
Hi rikuge,
Quote:
Back to the fundamentals
From my experience, this never ends. :blackeye:


This post by EdLee was liked by: Ian Butler
Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #22 Posted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 12:54 pm 
Beginner

Posts: 13
Liked others: 1
Was liked: 2
Rank: 6kyu
IGS: 6kyu
OGS: 5kyu
One stone at a time

Over the past few days I've focused on getting better at shapes by watching Dsaun's shape lecture and reading the book 'Shape up' by Charles Matthews and Seong-June Kim. With my increased knowledge on shape making I've start to look back at some of my earlier games and found a massive amount of bad shape present in those. After this I'm trying to be more concisious of shape in my games. There is however so much that needs my attention, direction of play, liberty counting, terrority counting I can't help but feel overwhelmed every time I play. Hopefully that will get better as i progress.

At OGS I've finally hit 14k. This was my most recent game against a 15k player. There is so much room from improvement (with obvious mistakes from both sides). But overall I'm content with my progress so far, but very eager to learn more.



Current rank: 14 kyu (OGS)
Current goal: 9 kyu (OGS) by 31-12-2018
Currently reading: Shape up!

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #23 Posted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:36 pm 
Lives in gote
User avatar

Posts: 529
Liked others: 46
Was liked: 184
Re: shape.

:w14: is overextended. The rule of thumb is that from a wall of n stones (if n=1,2,3,4), make an n+1 space extension.

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #24 Posted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:40 pm 
Honinbo

Posts: 8815
Liked others: 2600
Was liked: 3006
rikuge wrote:
One stone at a time

Over the past few days I've focused on getting better at shapes by watching Dsaun's shape lecture and reading the book 'Shape up' by Charles Matthews and Seong-June Kim. With my increased knowledge on shape making I've start to look back at some of my earlier games and found a massive amount of bad shape present in those. After this I'm trying to be more concisious of shape in my games. There is however so much that needs my attention, direction of play, liberty counting, terrority counting I can't help but feel overwhelmed every time I play. Hopefully that will get better as i progress.


Let me pass on some applicable advice for that kind of overwhelm. Study the game, but when you play, forget what you have learned.

That sounds paradoxical, but focus on the current game, the current move. If you need something that you have learned, you will have it. If you need something that you haven't learned yet, maybe you will find it. Relax and focus.

_________________
The Adkins Principle:

At some point, doesn't thinking have to go on?

— Winona Adkins

I think it's a great idea to talk during sex, as long as it's about snooker.

— Steve Davis

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #25 Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:30 am 
Gosei
User avatar

Posts: 1339
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Liked others: 188
Was liked: 590
Rank: Bel 2d KGS 3d TG 4d
KGS: Artevelde
Tygem: Knotwilg
You outplayed the opponent in the opening. I added a few notes about it.

The highlight of the game is the fight in the middle arising from the invasion of your moyo, between 57 and 64, where I'm offering some thoughts, fueled by LZ analysis.


Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #26 Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:26 pm 
Beginner

Posts: 13
Liked others: 1
Was liked: 2
Rank: 6kyu
IGS: 6kyu
OGS: 5kyu
Knotwilg wrote:
You outplayed the opponent in the opening. I added a few notes about it.

The highlight of the game is the fight in the middle arising from the invasion of your moyo, between 57 and 64, where I'm offering some thoughts, fueled by LZ analysis.



Thanks for the extensive review. Very interesting to see the patterns that you / LZ came up with. The double hane at 64 didn't feel solid, so I'm glad to see some nice alternative. Also, I pulled back on move 72 since i regarded that middle group as dead, he didn't notice it and played 73 which lost him/her the game I think.

@Bill: Will keep that in mind thank you :).

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #27 Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:04 pm 
Beginner

Posts: 13
Liked others: 1
Was liked: 2
Rank: 6kyu
IGS: 6kyu
OGS: 5kyu
It's been exactly a year since I started my journey and what year it has been!

Sum of the highlights:

- Joined the Yunguseng league
- Visited the European Go congress (sadly had to quit after one day because of illness)
- Played in the Amsterdam Go Tournament
- Went to Yunguseng spring camp.

I really need to get better at fighting, most of my games I win because of a "strong" opening". Does anyone have some tips for me?

Currently sitting on a 5k OGS / 6k IGS rating. The game below was one my most recent games and left me with a good feeling.



Next to the highs there were also several lows. After 7 months and the spring camp I was kind of burned out. Normally, I'm not a very competitive person however with Go, losing really hurt my self-confidence. Also, my progress was stagnating and it really got me down, this was also primarily caused by game anxiety. More than half of the time I spent on go I spent on watching tutorials, streams and reading books instead of actually playing. My solution for this was to play as many fast games as I could. This caused my game anxiety to reduce, however I was getting careless and didn't get the enjoyment out of playing as I used to.

All in all with Go for me there is a thin line between caring too much and caring too little. The friendships and beauty of the game really pulled me through though this last year, and I can confidently that Go will be a large part of my life in the coming year.

My goal for this year is to play as many games as I can and meet new people along the way :).


Attachments:
HMWEIGETMR.sgf [4.49 KiB]
Downloaded 94 times
Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #28 Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:50 pm 
Gosei
User avatar

Posts: 1339
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Liked others: 188
Was liked: 590
Rank: Bel 2d KGS 3d TG 4d
KGS: Artevelde
Tygem: Knotwilg
I was skeptical when you said you win games by playing a good opening, but then when I saw this game, I must admit you do have a good opening and you indeed take a decisive advantage there.

I find you have a good direction of play: you know where the territories are, where to attack for profit. You have good timing too. When you played away, I almost invariably agreed.

Your way of playing Go shows that you are very mindful about it. That's likely to give you a lot of pleasure playing.

I've reincluded your game with 10 questions.


Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #29 Posted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 6:48 pm 
Honinbo

Posts: 8815
Liked others: 2600
Was liked: 3006
rikuge wrote:
I really need to get better at fighting, most of my games I win because of a "strong" opening". Does anyone have some tips for me?


I can offer reassurance. I also had a good opening at around your level. In time the rest of your game will catch up, as you gain experience. You can certainly make dan level. :)

In your latest game, by :w44: you had a good lead. There was still a big play on the left side, but you eventually got that, too. :) (BTW, you should have played around :w44: earlier, to support your group in the top right corner.) You didn't do anything stupid, and eventually you won. Winning a "won" game is not always so easy, but to improve you should try for more than just not doing anything stupid.

:b45: was a good reducing play, which you parried well. :) :w50: was good, preventing Black from making good shape and threatening to push and cut. :b51: defended, but Black still has weaknesses. :w52: was a solid play, good enough to win the game, but Q-05 would have been even better. (You played there later. :)) And O-07 would have been even better, threatening the push and cut and forcing Black to make bad shape to prevent that. O-07 remained a good play well into the game.

:w56: would normally be a horrid play, threatening only to take two stones on the side. The thing is, you were so far ahead that Black had to save those stones. Playing a good opening lets you get away with bad plays later on. (Not that you should play a bad opening, OC. ;))

:w58: pushes from behind. That is not a good way to attack. You didn't need a good attack, so you got away with that. Better attack: White O-07, threatening to push and cut. Black P-07 connecting with a bamboo joint. White O-10, getting ahead of Black. White's aim should be to contain Black's group to the bottom right quadrant, where it is outnumbered, and currently eyeless. Can Black live inside? Maybe so, but make him prove it. Since he is only a 7 kyu, probably not. And if he does live, you will have made outside strength, which will do two things. 1) Make territory in the top right. 2) Attack Black's running group in the bottom left. For instance, you may be able to play the attachment at H-08 at cut his 5 stones off. Maybe he can live with them, maybe not. ;) It goes without saying that if he does live inside, you should take sente to attack the other weak Black group.

:w60: was a good play, preventing Black from playing there and threatening to push and cut. It would have been even better to start with O-07.

:w62: Very important. The jump to K-09 separates and attacks both Black groups. Black will probably run out with the group on the right, and then you can attack the one on the left.
You do not need this attack to win the game, as you demonstrated, and there is some risk that you will make a mistake and lose it. But the practice you get in attacking will make up for the occasional lost game. :blackeye: :rambo:

You play a very good opening, which means that in the middle game you are poised to go for the kill. In his Killer of Go series, still in print, I think, Sakata advised kyu players to go for the kill. If you review your game with bots, they will probably not tell you to do so, because you will not have to to win the game. But if you want to improve, go for the kill. In this game you could have confined Black to the bottom right quadrant, where he probably would have died, and if not, you could then turn your attack to the weak group in the bottom left. As tennis instructor Vic Braden used to say, Go for the early lunch. ;)

With your good opening, become a killer of go and you will advance rapidly. :)

Good luck!

Edit: After thought. While bots may not recommend attacking in order to win, you can use them in review to suggest attacking plays. :) Once you start attacking, they can point out overplays, as well.

_________________
The Adkins Principle:

At some point, doesn't thinking have to go on?

— Winona Adkins

I think it's a great idea to talk during sex, as long as it's about snooker.

— Steve Davis

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #30 Posted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 7:09 am 
Lives with ko

Posts: 166
Liked others: 16
Was liked: 9
Rank: IGS 5k
KGS: Bki
IGS: mlbki
rikuge wrote:
I really need to get better at fighting, most of my games I win because of a "strong" opening". Does anyone have some tips for me?


Beside frequent and numerous tsumego and tesuji problems, my advice would be to try to make your games as messy and complicated as possible. I've yet to master the art of turning a game into a whole board semeai so I can't advice on that one, but going for a very territorial style early then invading deep is one option (exemplified best by the "invade both 3-3, live on the side" strategy), or the opposite, making large frameworks to force your opponent to invade. Then there's the start running fight and make it so several groups are struggling against each other to make life in the center. You can also look into joseki that lead to a fight in the center (which don't necessarily have to be the super complicated taisha or avalanche or magic sword or whatever).

Taking sente while leaving acceptable weakness in your shape is another way to get into complication when you opponent try to punish that.

tl:dr : If you want to get better at fighting, get into more fights.

Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #31 Posted: Sun Sep 15, 2019 3:43 am 
Beginner

Posts: 13
Liked others: 1
Was liked: 2
Rank: 6kyu
IGS: 6kyu
OGS: 5kyu
Knotwilg wrote:
I was skeptical when you said you win games by playing a good opening, but then when I saw this game, I must admit you do have a good opening and you indeed take a decisive advantage there.

I find you have a good direction of play: you know where the territories are, where to attack for profit. You have good timing too. When you played away, I almost invariably agreed.

Your way of playing Go shows that you are very mindful about it. That's likely to give you a lot of pleasure playing.

I've reincluded your game with 10 questions.


Thanks for the review. Really appreciate it. Looked it over and replied.







Bill Spight wrote:
With your good opening, become a killer of go and you will advance rapidly. :)

Good luck!


Thanks for your comments and kind words, learned a lot from this game!


Attachments:
283f22ffa2c6aa61d81f275244f0ba081bcdfda8.sgf [6.18 KiB]
Downloaded 63 times
Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #32 Posted: Sun Sep 15, 2019 3:55 am 
Beginner

Posts: 13
Liked others: 1
Was liked: 2
Rank: 6kyu
IGS: 6kyu
OGS: 5kyu
Bki wrote:
rikuge wrote:
I really need to get better at fighting, most of my games I win because of a "strong" opening". Does anyone have some tips for me?


Beside frequent and numerous tsumego and tesuji problems, my advice would be to try to make your games as messy and complicated as possible. I've yet to master the art of turning a game into a whole board semeai so I can't advice on that one, but going for a very territorial style early then invading deep is one option (exemplified best by the "invade both 3-3, live on the side" strategy), or the opposite, making large frameworks to force your opponent to invade. Then there's the start running fight and make it so several groups are struggling against each other to make life in the center. You can also look into joseki that lead to a fight in the center (which don't necessarily have to be the super complicated taisha or avalanche or magic sword or whatever).

Taking sente while leaving acceptable weakness in your shape is another way to get into complication when you opponent try to punish that.

tl:dr : If you want to get better at fighting, get into more fights.


Followed your advice and made an account and made an account on Tygem, as I heared that they have a lot more aggresive playstyle vs. the playstyle of IGS.
This game was a bit messy which ultimately led to several big mistakes in the end. Most games that I lose, I lose in a similar way, not being able to get enough out of an attack or not minding my own shape enough / losing a big group.

Also, I do need to pump those Tsumego / Tesuji numbers. Does anyone know where I can buy the Lee Chang Ho Tesuji books? I really like the format of a relatively small that I can finish with 1-2 days.



Attachments:
tygem_1.sgf [1.3 KiB]
Downloaded 66 times
Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #33 Posted: Sun Sep 15, 2019 9:02 am 
Gosei
User avatar

Posts: 1339
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Liked others: 188
Was liked: 590
Rank: Bel 2d KGS 3d TG 4d
KGS: Artevelde
Tygem: Knotwilg
Review with 10 questions - this time with focus on fighting and middle game


Top
 Profile  
 
Offline
 Post subject: Re: A dive into the wondrous world of Go
Post #34 Posted: Sun Sep 15, 2019 1:26 pm 
Honinbo

Posts: 8815
Liked others: 2600
Was liked: 3006
Several comments. :)

:b7: Probably better to "enclose" the top right corner with R-13 or R-14. You don't need to focus on your two stones in the bottom right, the bots tell us.

:b11: Probably better at O-17, to work with the Black stones on the right side.

:w12: Small. Very likely mistake.

:w14: Obviously bad.

:b15: Perhaps a memory from a different position. I assume that you invaded with the idea of either living in the corner or connecting to the right side. :w14: makes the :w6: stone bad, as it forms an empty triangle. One problem with :b15: is that it looks to possible Black life with stones on S-02 and S-04. But if Black plays at S-04 and White plays at S05. then :w6: looks good, as a necessary connection. Besides, the :w8: stone gives Black some leeway and it is not so difficult to make life. :b15: is better on Q-03. Assuming White contains Black to the corner with :w16: - :w18:, Black lives by playing on R-03. That way :w6: still looks bad.
I know that you have to read ahead for this, but it's pretty much a one lane road and only 7 moves deep. :)

Aside: You do not have to invade right now. Invasion is one way to capitalize on your strength in the opening. But, even though you are ahead, you risk losing your advantage by getting into fights before you have a big advantage. Another good play for :b15: is O-17. Let White make some more mistakes before getting into a fight.

:w16: White makes another mistake, going after the small rather than the large.

:b17: You shouldn't follow your opponent around when your opponent is strong. Don't follow your opponent when your opponent is weak. (By comparison, your opponent is worse than you during the opening. :)) Make the bigger play, O-03. You don't want to take the :w16: stone, anyway, as that would end up making the :w6: stone good.

:b21: The worst has come to pass. However, best play is above the SDK level. Fortunately, the Black corner is small enough to sacrifice, but how to do so, or to threaten to do so, takes a good bit of skill. The double peep at O-03 may be best, but the play is difficult. This illustrates the problem with seeking fights before you have built up a lead.

:b23: A minor error, but the capture is better.

:w24: White likes to make small plays. Possibly from greed, trying to take away potential Black territory.

:b25: Giving White outside strength is questionable. For one thing, it may help White's thin extension at C-11. O-17 still looks good. More importantly, it will hinder possible invasions by Black on the bottom side.

:w36: Fortunately, White doesn't know what he is doing.

:b37: The peep at F-03 looks good. Also, the solid connection makes the White sagari at E-01 sente, while the handing connection makes the sagari at A-06 sente. The sagari at E-01 is worse for Black.

:w38: White does not know what he is doing.

:b39: A-03 makes two eyes.

:b47: Given the E-02 and E-01 stones, this play does not make a base for Black. Instead of a play on the bottom side, it is probably better to push through at O-04, which threatens the White stones in the bottom right, which do not yet have two eyes.

:b55: - :b61: Don't follow your weak opponent around. Push through at O-04.

:b65: The two step hane is better. A useful tesuji.

:b67: Back to O-04.

:b69: This might have been a good play earlier, to separate and attack two White groups. But now it's just small.

:w70: White does not know what he is doing.

:b71: Strengthens White and is small, besides. O-04 remains big, as usual.

:w84: White has handed Black the game on a tray.

:b85: Probably not best, but a good play.

:b87: Good. :)

:w88: Again, White goes small.

:b89: Don't follow a weak opponent around. Jump to M-06 combines attack and defense.

:b91: Small. Jump to M-06.

:b95: Starts a fight where Black is weak. Jump to M-06.

:b1: (Black 101). Threatens the cut at G-05, but Black is too weak locally.

:b3: Good idea. :)

:b5: M-06 is still good. The game play is not as good for defense, nor as good for attacking White on both sides.

:b7: Not a bad move, but feels like an attempt to save two stones. By contrast, the keima, J-08, threatens a large White group, and if the attacks moves towards the right, may end up attacking the weak group on the right, as well.

:b9: Eye off the ball. Black must keep the White groups separated. Better to play L-07.

----

I am going to stop here, even though Black is well ahead. Three main points:

1) Same as before. Keep you opponent's attackable stone separated, as a rule.

2) Do not follow a weak opponent around. (That's all of your opponents right now. ;))

3) Psychologically, it seems to me that the desire to save your own weak stones led to poor decisions. In particular, running with your two stones with Black 107, while not a bad play in itself, made difficulties for yourself, not your opponent.

----

Edit: A few more comments.

:b33: (Black 133). Bad decision to save a few stones.

:b55:, :b57: Not fatal, but it feels like Black is trying to save his stones, not capture the White cutting stone or other stones.

:b65: A failure to count dame?

:b77: Does not gain a dame. Sigh!

:b79: Saves the small, sacrifices the large.

:b89: Too soon to resign. Black can still goof.

----

The reading failure aside, White lost his advantage by a failure to attack.

_________________
The Adkins Principle:

At some point, doesn't thinking have to go on?

— Winona Adkins

I think it's a great idea to talk during sex, as long as it's about snooker.

— Steve Davis

Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 34 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group